UP TO SOMETHING!

Even though I haven’t blogged much this summer, I have been working on several new projects.

In June, a friend and I gathered our collective resources and made this baby quilt.  She had been asked to make the quilt as a commissioned piece, and she doesn’t like to applique.  I, on the other hand, LOVE to applique!  So we decided to join forces to make it happen.  I did the applique, she did the piecing, and we had one very happy client.

baby boy quilt

Also in June the two oldest grand-monkeys came to visit.  We had 4 fun filled days playing in the river and starting our fairy garden.  Our fairy garden started out as a very weed-filled old flower bed.  We were able to get it weeded and get a river rock path in place before they had to go back home.  I can’t believe how quickly they are growing up, and it will likely be Christmas before I see them again (which is definitely not soon enough.)

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Collecting Rocks

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Our fairy garden has a rock path

Last but not least, our nephew married the love of his life in the month of June.  It was such a beautiful and fun wedding.  I am so very happy for them, and knowing that their marriage is built on the love of our Lord Jesus Christ makes it that much more special.

LOVE

July we celebrated our youngest son’s birthday.  He turned 16 and he is also growing up much too fast.  He’s my baby so I want to keep him small as long as possible.  But he grew taller than me this past year.  I wouldn’t say that he is spoiled, although his sister and brothers would probably not agree.  I just like to think that since his older siblings have moved out, we, the parents, are less stressed and are therefore usually nicer. HAHA!  Isn’t he the lucky one!

16-years old

16-years old

Then I went blackberry picking beside the road.  Within 5 minutes I had fallen and hurt my hand very badly.  That put me out of commission for about 3 weeks before I got good movement back, and another 2-3 weeks before I got any strength back in it.  So, I wasn’t able to do any quilting for about 3 weeks.  It was a very sad time.  😦

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August has kept me busy with taxes and a secret project.  Even though I left my full-time tax position over a year ago and am now working in real estate, I still do some taxes on the side. So, several months each year (Feb-April and Aug-Oct) I might have to spend several weekends working on business and individual tax returns.

Wait, did I just mention something about a secret project?  Well, it’s true.  I do have a secret project in progress.  It will be a few months before I can share the whole quilt with you, but here’s a few sneak peak photos.  This has been my quilting project for the month of August.  I plan to have the top finished this weekend, then it will be sent on to my long-arm magician.  No way am I going to try to quilt this one myself!  IMG_4503

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So, you see, I have been UP TO SOMETHING!

Till we meet again…

Linking up with Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, Finish it Friday at Crazy Mom Quilts, and  Can I Get a Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict.

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Wedding Planning

I’m back!.  Busy season was much worse this year than normal.  Through mid-September I was working up to 14 hours a day, 70-75 hours a week, which didn’t leave much time for anything else.  I hope I never have to do that again.

Since then, I have been working on planning my daughter’s wedding.  Actually she’s my step-daughter, but I raised her since she was 7, so I have laid claim to her as her mother. She is getting married on Oct 19, so I am trying to plan a wedding in just under 5 weeks. That’s not waiting ’till the last minute, is it?  It’s not that I wanted to wait and do it all in one month, it’s just that I didn’t have time to fit it in with all the hours I was working.

Thankfully, she had the location picked out and a general idea of what she wanted.   Also, thankfully, it is going to be a fairly small wedding – just 50-60 people.  But small doesn’t mean lacking in any area, so there is still much to be done.  And as someone who believes in doing my things myself, this is a DIY wedding.

So, here’s my plan and how it’s been working…

Week 1: Search Pinterest for ideas.  Total success!  There are so many great ideas on Pinterest.  We have very creative people in this world, and I am very thankful that they are willing to share their ideas.  Country or rustic weddings seem to be all the rage right now. We are doing a spin off of that — a little bit of rustic, with little bit of lace.  I think I would call it Shabby Chic.  At least that’s how it is coming together in my head.  I hope it ends up looking just as nice in person.

Week 2-3: Search for and buy all supplies.  Found some good deals on Craiglist, the local thrift store, and a local consignment shop.  Had to buy a few things new, but not much. And although I couldn’t find everything I was looking for, I found things I could substitute.

Weeks 3-4: Crafting.  I am making the flower girl dresses and hairpieces, ring bearer bow tie and suspenders, the ring box and a sign for the two ring bearers to carry, bride’s headpiece, wedding favors, all decorations for the wedding and reception, and many more things to mention.

Week 5 which starts tomorrow: Finish up the decorations and make all the food.  I didn’t get as many things made last week as I had hoped.  In fact, all I got done was the flower girl dresses and the hairpiece for the bride. Thankfully I am taking this next week off work; otherwise, I’m not sure I would be able to get everything done.   Hopefully, it will all come together without too much stress.  But I expect to be very, very busy for the next week.

hairpiece for the bride

flower girl dress

Thankfully, other members of our family are handling other parts of the wedding.  My mother-in-law is making the cake, my sister and niece are doing the pictures, a friend of the groom’s will be the DJ for the afternoon, and my (step) daughter’s mother is doing the flowers for the bridal party.

Oh, and did I mention that we also had 3 family birthday’s this week.  My oldest granddaughter turned 4 yesterday.  She is growing up so fast.  And honeyman’s brithday is tomorrow.

Eve turns 4

I’m making things to take to the fair again this year and they have to be turned in no later than this coming Monday morning.  There really is too much going on in my life right now.

Even with as much fun as I am having doing the stuff for the wedding, and as busy as I am with everything else, I so want to quilt!  I really miss quilting.  It has been at least 10 weeks since I have had time to work on even a little quilt.  So, that is my plan for the last half of October and all of November — QUILT!!!  Well, as much as I can with working full-time, traveling several weeks for work, and babysitting 5 nights a week.  Oh, why do I have a feeling I’m going to have a hard time fitting it in even then?

And, even though these are not quilting finishes, I do have several finishes, so I am linking up with Finish it Friday at Crazy Mom Quilts, Link a Finish Friday at Richard and Tanya, and Can I Get a Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict.

Lego, Car, Truck Sack Tutorial

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My grandson turned 2 today.  He loves playing with cars and trucks.  To him, anything with wheels is a truck — a vacuum cleaner, a bus, a cart.  There is no difference.  Wheels = truck.  Period.

I made my nephew a Lego sack in December for Christmas and I thought it would be a great idea for a truck sack as well.  All you need is somewhat different fabric, and you have a cool sack for things with wheels.

Following is a tutorial for making your own sack whether it be for Legos, things with wheels, or little ponies.  I included a bunch of pictures, so this post is quite long.  But it’s easy peasy so you should be able to get through it quickly.  Feel free to let me know if you have questions, or if you run across problems with the tutuorial

Lego Sack or Car Sack Tutorial

Materials Needed:

1-1/4 yards interior fabric

1-1/4 yards exterior fabric

4-1/8 yards cording or rope, 3/8” – 1/2” wide

Scrap pieces of heavy duty interfacing or craft fuse

General Sewing Supplies – thread, scissors, pins, marking pen or chalk, measuring tape

Most fabric is 42”-44” wide.  You will want to start by cutting the length of your fabric to be the same as the width of the fabric.  So, if your fabric is 44” wide, the length should also be 44” so that you have a square.  There are a couple of ways you could do this as pictured below.  This is a small sample of fabric I am using just for demonstration.  This does not need to be perfect, close will work.

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Once you have your fabric length and width the same size, fold the interior fabric in half, and then in half again, such that a square is formed.   Then do the same for the exterior fabric.  Place one on top of the other, matching the corner fold and lining up the edges.

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Using your measuring tape, measure from the folded corner out to the raw edge, a distance of ½ of the width of your fabric.  My fabric was 44” wide and 44” long before I folded it into a square; therefore I am going to measure 22” from the folded corner and make a mark at that point.  If your fabric was 43” wide, you would be making a mark at the 21 ½” point.  (Note: from the last picture to this picture, I flipped my fabric over so the folded corner would be to my left, instead of my right.  I am right handed so I wanted to hold the tape at the folded corner with my left hand, and make the marks at 22″ with my right hand)

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Continue to move the tape measure across the square of fabric, starting at the folded corner each time and making a mark at the 22” point.  This will create an arc across your fabric.

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Once you have an arc marked across your fabric, cut along the dotted line.  (Note: You will be cutting through 8 layers of fabric, so if your scissors are not strong enough for this, you will need to cut the interior and the exterior fabric separately, in which case the other fabric will also need to be marked following the instructions above.)

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 Once you have cut along the arc you should have two nearly perfect circles that are 44” in diameter.

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At this point you will need to decide how you want to create the holes on the interior fabric for access to the cording.  I used buttonholes for mine, but you could also use extra large eyelets.  On the interior fabric, place pins marking where you would like to create the buttonholes.   I put 4 buttonholes on mine, spaced evenly around the circle.  Since the fabric had been folded it had created 4 equaled-distance fold lines.  So I used those fold lines as placement for the buttonholes.

At the placement for the first buttonhole, measure down ¾” from edge and make a mark, and then measure down ¾” from that mark and make another mark.   This is where I will create a ¾” buttonhole, with a ½” opening.  I used a flat ½” wide cording and it was a tight fit through the buttonholes.  If you have a larger diameter cord, you may want to make a larger buttonhole.

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Now that I know where the buttonhole will be, I like to stabilize the fabric by ironing some interfacing onto the wrong side of the fabric before actually sewing the buttonhole.  I used heavy-duty craft fuse.  Since it has a grain, I ironed on one small piece on the back of where the buttonhole will be, and then ironed on another small piece on top of that with the grain going the opposite direction.  This will strengthen the buttonhole and provide more stability to this area since this is where the weight of the sack will be held.   I would also suggest doing this if you were to use large eyelets instead of buttonholes.

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Do this for all four buttonholes around your circle.  And then sew and open each buttonhole.  The interior of your bag is now ready.

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 If you wanted to do anything special to the exterior of the bag, now would be the time.  I embroidered my grandson’s name onto this one. 

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Moving on…

With right sides together, pin the circles together.  You don’t need many pins, but 10-12 around will help hold it together as you sew.  Once pinned, sew a 3/8” seam around, leaving about 4” unsewn for turning.  Clip edges around, being sure not to clip any of your stitching.  This will help the circle lay flatter.  (I forgot to take a picture of this, but if you need help with it, let me know and I’ll take a picture of a sample and email it to you quickly.)

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Turn right side out and press seam flat.  You may need to roll the seam between your fingers before pressing in order to get the seam to the outer most edge.

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Once the seam has been pressed flat, sew around edge of the sack about ¼” from edge.  Then sew around the sack again about 1-¼” from edge.   (If you do not have a sewing guide for your machine, you may need to mark this second line all the way around.  I know I wouldn’t be able to eyeball that distance with any precision.) The buttonholes should be between the two lines of sewing you just made.  This will create a pocket around the sack for the cord.

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Thread your cord through the pocket, all the way around until you get to the beginning again.  I like to use a safety pin to do this, although you might have your own favorite method.   Tie a knot to join the two ends.  You may need to burn both ends of the cord so it doesn’t unravel.

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Pull up a loop of the cord from the buttonhole that is directly opposite that knot, and tie a knot on that side as well.  This will give you easy access to pull the cord from each side to close the sack.  At the moment, I am leaving the other two buttonholes unused, but you may find it easier to close the sack from all four corners, rather than just 2, especially as it gets full.

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Congratulations!  You have just made a lego sack.

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My grandson just turned two.  If you are making this for an older child, you may find that you need a larger circle.  To do this you would need to either buy 60” wide fabric or sew two widths of fabric together for both the exterior and interior.   You would also need a longer length of fabric.  However, the instructions for creating the sack would be the same.  You start with a square (the length and width of fabric being the same size) and go from there.